Keeping it Professional. Tips for Child Carers - Find a Nanny

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Keeping it Professional. Tips for Child Carers

Daily Diary or a Child Care Logbook
Daily Diary or a Child Care Logbook

Keep a Daily Diary or a Child Care Logbook

Whether you are a nanny or babysitter or a domestic worker who looks after children, all professional child carers should keep a daily logbook as a record of their activities. It sounds like a real pain, and it is. It also seems like a waste of time, but it isn't. It's the professional thing to do, and when parents notice that you keep a log, it will reflect positively on you.

It's a sad thing to say, but child abuse is found everywhere, in every culture and every country. The term "abuse" may be used for quite mild omissions, such as not changing nappies quickly enough, or leaving a child unattended for too long. To be accused of improper child care can be a real career killer, and you need to take every step which you can think of to make sure you are not a casualty.

Here are some things which you should record in your daily diary or logbook:

Children up to one year old:

  • Immediately comment to the parent and log any bruises or scratches.
  • The time of each nappy (diaper) change was done each day.
  • Record any rash you observe when changing.
  • How many millilitres of milk and what type of milk it was.
  • How many naps the baby took, for how long and what times during the day.
  • Observations about  motor skills such as eye contact, body movements and crying spells.
  • What type of activities you did with the baby, such as reading stories, singing nursery rhymes or exercising limbs.
  • Any observations which you feel may have some significance.
  • Comments the parents made to you which my seem unusual.

Children over on year old:

  • Immediately comment to the parent and log any bruises, scratches or rash.
  • Number and times of any bowel movements and  progress in toilet training.
  • What was eaten during mealtimes and what quantity was eaten.
  • Nap times and duration.
  • Observations about  motor skills such as eye contact, body movements and crying spells.
  • What type of activities you did with the child, such as reading stories, singing nursery rhymes or exercising limbs.
  • A progress report on educational activities, such as ABCs, numbers, shapes, words and colours.
  • Any observations which you feel may have some significance.
  • Comments the parents made to you which may seem unusual.

When you have cultivated the habit of being a log-keeper, parents should recognise this as an accurate record of the days events and observations. If you wrote down that a bruise was noticed at 8am, you can show the parent your record when she comes to pick up the child at 6pm.

You may find it convenient to use a smart phone or a tablet to keep the records on, but in this particular case

 

 

  

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